Saturday 14 December 2019, 07:16 PM
Pakistan can’t afford to fight conventional war against India
By Sushil Sharma | Bharat Defence Kavach | Publish Date: 11/1/2019 3:19:05 PM
Pakistan can’t afford to fight conventional war against India

India and Pakistan have had four three full-fledged wars and a small-scale battle in Kargil in the over seven decades of their existence since 1947 when the British left South Asia once and for all. In these 70 years, India midwifed the birth of Bangladesh during the 1971 war and also uprooted the Pakistani regulars who had occupied the Kargil heights in 1999.

Between these two extremes, India and Pakistan have always had minor sector-wise sniping and firing at each other's troopers all along the 740-km Line of Control, apart from the guns booming at the icy heights of Siachen Glacier, the world's highest battlefield, from 1984 to 2003.

The two nations came close to war once again in February 2019 when Indian combat jets bombed terrorists’ hideouts at Balakot deep inside Pakistan following a terror attack on a security personnel convoy in Pulwama earlier that month and Pakistan reciprocated with bombs dropped by its combat jets. That minor three-day armed conflict led to India losing a MiG-21 and its pilot Abhinandan Varthaman ejecting out of that aircraft into Pakistan territory, getting captured by their security personnel and later released after two-day detention. Abhinandan also shot down a Pakistan F-16 during that aerial dog fight.

In the run-up to Balakot strikes, Army Chief Gen. Bipin Rawat very categorically conveyed to the top brass of the government that his force was fully ready to deal with any ground offensive by Pakistan and take the battle into the enemy territory, it has been reported. The Indian Army was prepared for conventional warfare with Pakistan, including cutting deep inside Pakistan. This was one of the options that Rawat is said to have placed before the government for a military response to the Pulwama terror attack.

In 2019, India allocated $61 billion, or about two per cent of its gross domestic product (GDP), to support its 1.4 million active troops. Pakistan, on the other hand, spent $11.5 billion, or 3.5 per cent of its GDP, on its 653,800 troops.

Both nations have ballistic missiles capable of delivering nuclear weapons. India has nine types of operational missiles, including the nuclear-capable Agni-V with a range of over 5,500 km. Pakistan's missile programme, built with Chinese assistance, includes mobile short-range and medium-range weapons that can reach any part of India, including the Shaheen-2 having the longest range up to 2,000 km.

India has a 1.2 million-strong army, supported by more than 3,550 battle tanks, 3,000 infantry fighting vehicles, 340 armoured personnel carriers and 9,700 artillery guns. Pakistan's army is smaller, with 560,000 troops backed by 2,500 tanks, 1,600 armoured personnel carriers, and 4,470 artillery guns, including 375 self-propelled howitzers.

In building its preparedness in case the government chooses the land battle option, the Indian Army had finalised contracts to procure ammunition worth ₹11,000 crore after the Uri terror attack in September 2016 and has received 95 per cent of the total order. Till then, there was a huge gap between the prescribed war wastage reserve holdings by the Indian Army for 20 days battle.

The Indian Air Force has sought a doubling of its budget for the 2019-20 financial year to Rs 80,000 crore instead of the Rs 39,300 crore it received in July this year. The annual defence budget is coming up for revision in the next two months and would be finalised by December this year. The IAF pursuing the purchases of 114 combat jets, 83 light combat aircraft, six midair refuelers, 56 transport aircraft to replace the Avros, and another 75 basic trainers, all to boost its capabilities.

With 127,200 personnel and 800 combat aircraft, India's air force is substantially larger but there are concerns about its fighter jet fleet. India's defence plans require 42 squadrons of combat planes, about 750 aircraft, to defend against a two-pronged attack from China and Pakistan. With older Russian jets like the MiG-21, first used in the 1960s, retiring in the next two years, Indian Air Force could be reduced to less than 25 squadrons by 2025 after which its strength would grow due to inductions such as the Rafales, Light Combat Aircraft and the futuristic fifth-generation fighter indigenously being developed.

Pakistan has 400 combat aircraft, including the Chinese-origin F-7PG and American F-16 Fighting Falcon jets. It also has seven airborne early warning and control aircraft, three more than India, at present. The Pakistan air force is modernising its inventory while improving its precision-strike and ISR (intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance) capabilities.

India's navy consists of a fleet of nearly 140 warships including an aircraft carrier, 15 conventional, one nuclear powered and one other nuclear-armed submarines, 14 destroyers, 13 frigates, 106 patrol and coastal combatant vessels, and 75 combat-capable aircraft. It has 67,700 personnel, including marines and naval aviation staff. Pakistan, which has a significantly smaller coastline, has nine frigates, eight submarines, 17 patrol and coastal vessels, and eight combat-capable naval aircraft.
Sushil Sharma
India and Pakistan have had four three full-fledged wars and a small-scale battle in Kargil in the over seven decades of their existence since 1947 when the British left South Asia once and for all. In these 70 years, India midwifed the birth of Bangladesh during the 1971 war and also uprooted the Pakistani regulars who had occupied the Kargil heights in 1999.

Between these two extremes, India and Pakistan have always had minor sector-wise sniping and firing at each other's troopers all along the 740-km Line of Control, apart from the guns booming at the icy heights of Siachen Glacier, the world's highest battlefield, from 1984 to 2003.

The two nations came close to war once again in February 2019 when Indian combat jets bombed terrorists’ hideouts at Balakot deep inside Pakistan following a terror attack on a security personnel convoy in Pulwama earlier that month and Pakistan reciprocated with bombs dropped by its combat jets. That minor three-day armed conflict led to India losing a MiG-21 and its pilot Abhinandan Varthaman ejecting out of that aircraft into Pakistan territory, getting captured by their security personnel and later released after two-day detention. Abhinandan also shot down a Pakistan F-16 during that aerial dog fight.

In the run-up to Balakot strikes, Army Chief Gen. Bipin Rawat very categorically conveyed to the top brass of the government that his force was fully ready to deal with any ground offensive by Pakistan and take the battle into the enemy territory, it has been reported. The Indian Army was prepared for conventional warfare with Pakistan, including cutting deep inside Pakistan. This was one of the options that Rawat is said to have placed before the government for a military response to the Pulwama terror attack.

In 2019, India allocated $61 billion, or about two per cent of its gross domestic product (GDP), to support its 1.4 million active troops. Pakistan, on the other hand, spent $11.5 billion, or 3.5 per cent of its GDP, on its 653,800 troops.

Both nations have ballistic missiles capable of delivering nuclear weapons. India has nine types of operational missiles, including the nuclear-capable Agni-V with a range of over 5,500 km. Pakistan's missile programme, built with Chinese assistance, includes mobile short-range and medium-range weapons that can reach any part of India, including the Shaheen-2 having the longest range up to 2,000 km.

India has a 1.2 million-strong army, supported by more than 3,550 battle tanks, 3,000 infantry fighting vehicles, 340 armoured personnel carriers and 9,700 artillery guns. Pakistan's army is smaller, with 560,000 troops backed by 2,500 tanks, 1,600 armoured personnel carriers, and 4,470 artillery guns, including 375 self-propelled howitzers.

In building its preparedness in case the government chooses the land battle option, the Indian Army had finalised contracts to procure ammunition worth ₹11,000 crore after the Uri terror attack in September 2016 and has received 95 per cent of the total order. Till then, there was a huge gap between the prescribed war wastage reserve holdings by the Indian Army for 20 days battle.

The Indian Air Force has sought a doubling of its budget for the 2019-20 financial year to Rs 80,000 crore instead of the Rs 39,300 crore it received in July this year. The annual defence budget is coming up for revision in the next two months and would be finalised by December this year. The IAF pursuing the purchases of 114 combat jets, 83 light combat aircraft, six midair refuelers, 56 transport aircraft to replace the Avros, and another 75 basic trainers, all to boost its capabilities.

With 127,200 personnel and 800 combat aircraft, India's air force is substantially larger but there are concerns about its fighter jet fleet. India's defence plans require 42 squadrons of combat planes, about 750 aircraft, to defend against a two-pronged attack from China and Pakistan. With older Russian jets like the MiG-21, first used in the 1960s, retiring in the next two years, Indian Air Force could be reduced to less than 25 squadrons by 2025 after which its strength would grow due to inductions such as the Rafales, Light Combat Aircraft and the futuristic fifth-generation fighter indigenously being developed.

Pakistan has 400 combat aircraft, including the Chinese-origin F-7PG and American F-16 Fighting Falcon jets. It also has seven airborne early warning and control aircraft, three more than India, at present. The Pakistan air force is modernising its inventory while improving its precision-strike and ISR (intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance) capabilities.

India's navy consists of a fleet of nearly 140 warships including an aircraft carrier, 15 conventional, one nuclear powered and one other nuclear-armed submarines, 14 destroyers, 13 frigates, 106 patrol and coastal combatant vessels, and 75 combat-capable aircraft. It has 67,700 personnel, including marines and naval aviation staff. Pakistan, which has a significantly smaller coastline, has nine frigates, eight submarines, 17 patrol and coastal vessels, and eight combat-capable naval aircraft.

With the numbers and the preparations staked against it, Pakistan can never dream of fighting a war with Indian on all the four dimensions of warfare for more than two weeks' time at best. For carrying out such a full-scale war with Pakistan, India's only hurdle could be third party interference in the form of China, which has made huge investments in Pakistan-controlled regions of Kashmir through its China-Pakistan Economic Corridor programme and can be expected to step in to protect its investments in case India and Pakistan fight a conventional war anytime in the future.

With the numbers and the preparations staked against it, Pakistan can never dream of fighting a war with Indian on all the four dimensions of warfare for more than two weeks' time at best. For carrying out such a full-scale war with Pakistan, India's only hurdle could be third party interference in the form of China, which has made huge investments in Pakistan-controlled regions of Kashmir through its China-Pakistan Economic Corridor programme and can be expected to step in to protect its investments in case India and Pakistan fight a conventional war anytime in the future.
 

Tags:

India,Pakistan,Kargil,British,bombs,battlefield,Abhinandan,categorically

DEFENCE MONITOR

भारत डिफेंस कवच की नई हिन्दी पत्रिका ‘डिफेंस मॉनिटर’ का ताजा अंक ऊपर दर्शाया गया है। इसके पहले दस पन्ने आप मुफ्त देख सकते हैं। पूरी पत्रिका पढ़ने के लिए कुछ राशि का भुगतान करना होता है। पुराने अंक आप पूरी तरह फ्री पढ़ सकते हैं। पत्रिका के अंकों पर क्लिक करें और देखें। -संपादक

Contact Us: 011-66051627

E-mail: bdkavach@gmail.com

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER
NEWS & SPECIAL INSIDE !
Copyright 2018 Bharat Defence Kavach. All Rights Resevered.
Designed by : 4C Plus